Following the UK’s exit from the EU on 31 January, a transition period will apply until 31 December 2020. During this period, the UK and the aviation sector will continue to follow EU law and to participate in the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) system. As a result, businesses and individuals operating in the UK should see no change to existing conditions during the transition period, while the longer-term UK-EU relationship on aviation is determined. Please see the homepage for further details.

A fuller outline of the position as the UK enters the transition period is available here.

While the respective positions outlined in the UK Government and EU negotiating mandates indicate what both sides want in terms of future agreements on air transport and aviation safety and security, the conditions that will exist after the end of the transition period are still uncertain.


As the UK-EU negotiations move forward and more information becomes available, the CAA will update these FAQs and notify stakeholders of the updates through the SkyWise alert system. If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to the EU exit category in the SkyWise system: skywise.caa.co.uk

Engineers transferring their Part-66 licence to other Member States:

While the CAA will continue to accept and process Part 66 transfer applications under existing EASA transfer arrangements
while UK participation in EASA and mutual recognition of licences continues, the procedures adopted by the receiving NAA and recognised validity of the licence during the transfer process may vary amongst EU member states. Applicants who require continuity of validity throughout the transfer process are therefore advised to apply at least 3 months prior to the end of the transition period and should also consider engaging with their intended receiving NAA to identify any potential issues.

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, Part 66 licence holders may need to take action to minimise impact on their privileges. Actions required would depend on individual circumstances and are a matter for each business and individual to consider. This page sets out what you need to consider to prepare for such an eventuality.

PART-66 AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE LICENCE – ISSUED BY THE CAA

If I have an EASA Part-66 licence issued by the CAA would it still be valid after the end of the transition period?

Yes, CAA issued licences would remain valid. All CAA issued licences would be re-issued in due course to a new UK format, removing EASA references over time. Timescales for this would be advised at a later date but it would likely coincide with the normal licence renewal date.

Close

My UK based Part 145 organisation has applied for a third country approval from EASA. Would EASA accept UK Part 66 licences to support the approval?

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, the UK would be classified as a third country. Part 145 has provision to use non-EASA licences to support an approval issued in third countries. This is set out in Part 145.A.30 (j) paragraphs 1, 2 and Appendix IV. Certifying staff may be qualified in accordance with the national aviation regulations of the state in which the organisation facility is registered.

You are advised in conjunction with your Part 145 organisation, to contact EASA as soon as possible to discuss the approval process in this scenario.

Close

If I have an EASA Part-66 Licence issued by the CAA would I be able to continue to work on UK-registered aircraft?

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, CAA-issued licences would remain valid for use on aircraft registered in the UK that are maintained by organisations approved by the CAA. All CAA issued Licences would be re-issued to the new UK standard, removing EASA references over time. Timescales for this will be advised at a later date. 

Close

If I have an EASA Part-66 Licence issued by the CAA would I be able to continue to work on EU-registered aircraft?

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, you would not be able to continue to release EU-registered aircraft to service.

If you wish to continue to release EU-registered aircraft to service you would need to transfer your licence to the National Aviation Authority of another EASA member state before the end of the transition period. You are advised to have a discussion with the relevant NAA as soon as possible about their process and timetable for transfers.

While the CAA will continue to accept and process Part 66 transfer applications under existing EASA transfer arrangements until the end of the transition period, the procedures adopted by the receiving NAA and recognised validity of the licence during the transfer process may vary between EU member states. Applicants who require continuity of validity throughout the transfer process are therefore advised to apply at least 3 months prior to the end of the transition period and should also consider engaging with their intended receiving NAA to identify any potential issues.

Licence holders who transferred their state of licence issue who also wish to maintain aircraft registered in the UK after the transition period should follow the guidance below for Part 66 licence holders who hold a Part 66 licence issued by another EASA member state.

Close

If I complete basic or type training at a Part-147 approved organisation located outside the UK, would I be able to add these to my UK licence?

Yes. After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, it is intended that a Certificate of Recognition issued by a Part 147 approved organisation located outside the UK approved prior to the end of the transition period would be accepted for the issue or amendment of a UK-issued licence for up to two years.

Close

I have completed some of the basic training modules for my Part 66 licence. Would I be able to use these examinations when applying for a UK Part 66 licence?

Yes. After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, it is intended that a Certificate of Recognition for Module Examinations issued by either a UK-approved or non-UK Part 147 approved organisation would be accepted for the issue or amendment of a UK-issued licence (for the non-UK Part 147 organisation this would be limited for up to two years).

Close

I have completed some of the basic training modules for my Part 66 licence. Would I be able to use these examinations when applying for an EU Part 66 licence?

The European Union has adopted legislation which would allow these training module examinations to be used when applying for a EU Part 66 licence if completed before 29 March 2019 . Further details can be found on EASA’s website for Brexit.

The EU has also indicated that examinations completed under the CAA in the period between 29 March 2019 and UK participation in EASA ceasing, if that occurred, may also be allowed when applying for an EU Part-66, but potential applicants are advised to clarify this with their intended receiving NAA.

Close

I have a UK Part-66 licence but work outside the UK and Europe on non-UK registered aircraft – what would the impact be?

You would need to contact your local National Aviation Authority in the state where the aircraft you work on are registered.

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period, if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems and you work outside the EU and UK on EU-registered aircraft, your UK Part-66 licence would no longer be valid.

Close

Could I hold another EU NAA and a UK licence concurrently?

At present, under EASA regulations you can only hold one Part 66 licence.

You are advised to discuss with relevant NAAs or EASA their process and timetable for accepting applications for EU member state transfer prior to the end of the transition period.

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, you would be able to hold both a UK and EASA Part 66 licence concurrently.

The UK CAA would open an application process for engineers who had previously transferred their licence to another EU member state to allow the restoration of their UK licence. The process for this would be outlined at the end of the transition period.

Close

Could I transfer my licence to another EU member state NAA if UK national limitations are still applied?

Normally all national limitations are required to be removed prior to transfer. The decision to accept a transfer is the responsibility of the receiving EU member state NAA and you are advised to discuss with relevant the NAA or EASA as soon as possible.

The CAA has provided a dedicated application webpage and form to help guide applicants through this process.

Close

Would the CAA still recognise my Part 66 exams if I have taken them with another EU NAA or non-UK Part 147 approved organisation?

Yes. After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, it is intended that such Part 66 qualifications will continue to be recognised, but only for a period of up to two years.

Close

If I complete basic or type training at a Part-147 approved organisation located outside the UK, would I be able to add these to my UK licence?

Yes. After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, a Certificate of Recognition issued by a Part-147 approved organisation located outside the UK, which received its approval before the end of the transition period, would be accepted for the issue or amendment of a UK-issued licence for up to two years, provided the Part-147 approval also remained valid.

Close


PART-66 AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE LICENCE – ISSUED BY ANOTHER EU MEMBER STATE

If I have a Non-UK Part-66 Licence, would I be able to continue to work on UK-registered aircraft?

Yes. After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, it is intended that you would be able to continue to work on UK-registered aircraft for up to two years after the end of the transition period. Personnel working in organisations approved by the CAA who are based in the UK would need to obtain a UK CAA issued Part 66 licence after this point in time.

Individuals working in a UK Part-145 approved organisation located outside the UK may continue to work on UK-registered aircraft providing they fulfil the requirements of Part 145.A.30 (j) paragraphs 1 and 2 and subject to Appendix IV to Part 145.

Close

If I have completed basic or type training at a UK Part-147 approved organisation, would I be able to add the categories or ratings to my Part 66 licence issued by airworthiness authority of an EASA Member State?

EASA has not set out a process which would accept Certificates of Recognition issued by Part 147 organisations based in the UK. Further details can be found on EASA’s website for Brexit.

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there were no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, you are advised to contact EASA as soon as possible to discuss the application process in this scenario.  

Close

Would another EU NAA recognise and accept UK-issued 147 examination certificates and/or Certificate of Recognition?

EASA has not set out a process which would accept Certificates of Recognition issued by Part 147 organisations based in the UK. Further details can be found on EASA’s website for Brexit.

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there were no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, you are advised to contact EASA / EU NAA as soon as possible to discuss the application process in this scenario.

Close

How would the UK’s exit from the EU affect the application of Airworthiness Directives for the UK-registered aircraft that I own, operate or manage?

After the UK’s membership of the EASA system ceases at the end of the transition period and if there is no mutual recognition of safety certificates between the UK and European systems, all EU regulations applicable at the point of UK exit would be retained in UK domestic legislation, including Regulation (EU) No 1321/2014, Part M. This means owners, operators and Continuing Airworthiness Management Organisations (CAMOs) would continue to review and apply applicable Airworthiness Directives to their respective fleets based on requirements for the aircraft and its engines, propellers and equipment as set out in CAP 747 Mandatory Requirements for Airworthiness, Airworthiness Directives issued or adopted by EASA, plus any Airworthiness Directives notified by the State of Design.

You can view CAP 747 here: www.caa.co.uk/CAP747 

Close

Some of the regulation references in CAP 747 have been repealed, typically references to Regulation (EU) 216/2008 concerning EASA and non-EASA aircraft. Where can I find the latest information?

The CAA is aware that CAP 747 currently has some out-of-date references and is in the process of updating the document. Reference to superseded or amended regulations should be taken to mean the current version of the applicable regulation in force. The CAA will ensure any mandatory requirements for UK-registered aircraft are reflected within CAP 747 and also made available via the CAA website Airworthiness Directive page. 

For enquiries relating to ADs, please email ad.unit@caa.co.uk

Close