AEROMEDICAL EXAMINERS (AMEs) and Occupational Health Medical Practitioners (OHMPs): Position after 31 December 2020

Until 31 December 2020, all UK-certificated AMEs, OHMPs and Aeromedical Centres (AeMCs) will continue to be able to issue medical certificates to applicants who hold or are applying for EU licences and cabin crew attestations.

From 1 January 2021, all AMEs, OHMPs and AeMCs for whom the UK is the Competent Authority, will continue to be certificated to perform medical examinations on UK applicants and issue UK PART MED medical certificates and cabin crew medical reports. UK-certificated AMEs wishing to undertake EU medical examinations will have to apply to an EASA member state for third country approval (and/or to EASA for AeMCs).

From 1 January 2021 until 31 December 2022, non-UK EU AMEs (and AeMCs) will only be ‘recognised’ by the UK if the AME (or AeMC) approval certificate was valid on or before 31 December 2020 and had not expired, been suspended or revoked when the medical examination was performed. Examinations and assessments performed by EU OHMPs will not be recognised.

From 1 January 2023 all EU AME, EU OHMP and EU AeMC approval certificates will not be valid for undertaking UK PART MED medical examinations/assessments.

Will UK AMEs be able to issue UK medical certificates to pilots with UK-issued licences?

Yes. UK AMEs and Aeromedical Centres will retain their permissions and approvals under UK law. UK-licensed pilots will have to have medical certificates issued by UK-approved AMEs and Aeromedical Centres.

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Will UK AMEs be able to issue EU medical certificates to pilots with EU licences?

No. Currently certificated UK AMEs would have to apply to an EASA State for approval to conduct EU medicals as a third country AME.

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Will EU AMEs be able to issue UK medical certificates to UK licence holders?

From 1 January 2021 EU medical certificates issued by non-UK EU AMEs (and AeMCs) may be ‘recognised’ by the UK but only if the AME (+/- AeMC) approval certificate was valid on or before 31 December 2020 and had not expired, been suspended or revoked when the medical examination was performed.

For each EU medical certificate to be recognised by the UK, all the forms and tests relating to the medical, the medical certificate, and the current approval certificate of the AME (+/- AeMC) must be sent to the UK CAA Medical Department.

From 1 January 2023, examinations and assessments performed by EU AMEs will not be recognised unless a separate AME or AeMC approval has been granted by the CAA to perform UK medicals.

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Will UK AMEs and OHMPs be able to issue EU cabin crew medical reports to cabin crew with EU attestations?

No. From 1 January 2021, cabin crew examinations and assessments performed by EU AMEs and OHMPs will not be recognised for cabin crew employed by UK operators.

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Will EU AMEs be able to apply to the UK CAA to issue UK medical certificates?

Yes. Currently certificated EU AMEs would have to apply for approval to conduct UK medicals as a third country AME.

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Will AMEs be able to hold both a UK AME certificate and an EU AME certificate?

Yes. The application processes and AME certificate issues will be independent in the same way that a UK AME can currently also hold a certificate issued by, for example, the FAA, Transport Canada or CASA Australia.

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Can Aeromedical Centres apply for EU Approval as well as a UK one?

Yes. The application processes and AeMC approval processes will be independent in the same way as for AMEs. After the UK ceases to be an EASA member, EASA will accept third country applications from organisations wishing to be EU Aeromedical Centres. It is possible for UK Aeromedical Centres to apply to EASA for AeMC approval.

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The UK-EU trade deal, announced on 24 December 2020, includes agreements on air transport and aviation safety which are due to come into effect at 23.00 GMT on 31 December 2020 when the UK ceases to take part in the EU Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and other EU institutions. 

While the agreements involve some elements of continuity, they do not constitute a replication of the UK’s regulatory arrangements as part of the EASA/EU framework and many sections of the aviation and aerospace industries will face changes after 31 December, as this microsite sets out.

We will study the detail of the new agreements and will update relevant pages of the microsite as information becomes clearer about how the new arrangements will work in practice. We will notify stakeholders of the updates through the SkyWise alert system. If you haven’t already done so, please subscribe to the EU exit category in the SkyWise system: skywise.caa.co.uk



Medical Certificates

From 1 January 2021, all EU PART-FCL and EU PART-ATCO Licences and EU PART MED and EU PART ATCO MED medical certificates for which the UK is the State of Licence Issue (SOLI) will be considered to be UK licences and UK medical certificates.

It is the CAA’s understanding that medical certificates for which a non-UK EU state is the SOLI issued by a UK AME before 31 December 2020 will only be recognised as valid until their natural expiry, or the pilot/ATCO suffers a decrease in medical fitness when they will have to consult an EU-certificated AME (in consultation with the EU SOLI).

From 1 January 2021, UK-certified AME issued UK PART.MED medical certificates will no longer be legally valid for use with non-UK issued EU licences. They may only then be used for validation of UK PART FCL and UK PART ATCO licences.

During the UK ‘Recognition’ Period from 1 January 2021

The Statutory Instrument produced by the UK Government relating to the aircrew and ATCO regulations inter alia includes a ‘recognition’ period during which EU licences (i.e. non-UK SOLI), approvals and medical certificates will be ‘recognised’ for the remainder of their validity, or for up to two years, whichever is the shorter (provided they are not suspended or revoked).

Therefore, for medical examinations performed by EU AMEs from 1 January 2021, the medical certificates issued by them will only be ‘recognised’ by the UK (for validation of UK licences) if the AME approval certificate was valid prior to 31 December 2020, and had not expired or been suspended or revoked when the medical examination was performed. AMEs are generally approved by EU NAAs for a period of up to three years, so a number of them will have EU approval certificates that expire during the two-year ‘recognition’ period. When they revalidate, they will obviously continue to be able to issue EU medical certificates, but these will not be ‘recognised’ by the UK.

When performing such medicals for applicants with UK licences, EU AMEs will have to include a copy of their current approval certificate together with all the medical examination reports and tests to the UK CAA to prove that they are recognised to do the medical. Applicants should emphasise this to the AME, as non-compliance may result in the examination/ certificate not being considered valid.

After the UK ‘Recognition’ Period ends on 31 December 2022 

From 1 January 2023 all EU licences and EU medical certificates will no longer be recognised for UK licences. Licence holders will need a UK PART FCL Licence and UK PART MED Medical Certificate to fly G-registered aircraft, and separately an EU PART FCL Licence and EU PART MED Medical Certificate for EU licence privileges. (Similarly for ATCO licence holders with Class 3 medical certificates.)

What’s the position after 1 January 2021 for pilots with a UK-issued EU licence and EU medical certificate from a UK-certified AME?

Their UK-issued EU licence and EU medical certificate will be treated as a UK rather than a EU licence/medical. They will continue to be valid to fly G-registered aircraft. UK licences (apart from the LAPL) will continue to have ICAO privileges. They can continue to have medicals with UK-certificated AMEs.

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What’s the position after 1 January 2021 for pilots with a UK-issued EU licence and EU medical certificate from a non-UK EU-certified AME?

Their UK-issued EU licence and EU medical certificate will remain valid and be treated as a UK rather than a EU licence/medical. They will continue to be valid to fly G-registered aircraft. UK licences (apart from the LAPL) will continue to have ICAO privileges. From 1 January 2021, medicals with a non-UK EU AME will only be ‘recognised’ for their normal validity period or up to two years (whichever is the shorter) provided that the AME’s approval was valid on 31 December 2020 and the AME approval certificate had not been revalidated, renewed, suspended or revoked. A copy of the latter will need to be included with any medical examination report submitted by them to the UK CAA.

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What happens if UK licence holders become medically unfit or require AME medical assessments after 1 January 2021?

UK licence/medical certificate holders (i.e. those who held a UK-issued EU licence/medical on 31 December 2020) must consult UK-certificated AMEs (not EU-certificated AMEs) to take over their case for assessment and subsequent medicals. The UK-certificated AMEs will liaise with the UK CAA Medical department as required.

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What happens if EU licence holders become medically unfit or require AME medical assessments after 1 January 2021?

EU licence/medical certificate holders must consult EU-certificated AMEs (not UK-certified AMEs) who will liaise as required with the relevant EU State of Licence Issue’s medical department.

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