If no deal is concluded between the EU and the UK, organisations (Part 145) maintaining aircraft might need to take action to maximise continuity and stability for the aviation sector. Actions required would depend on individual circumstances and are a matter for each business and individual to consider. This page sets what you need to consider to prepare for such an eventuality.

PART-145 MAINTENANCE OF AIRCRAFT – UK APPROVED

Would my organisation continue to be able to certify UK-registered aircraft?

Yes, as a UK-approved Part-145 holder, you would be able to continue to certify UK-registered aircraft.

Close

Would my organisation continue to be able to certify EU-registered aircraft?

To continue to certify EU-registered aircraft you would also need to hold an EASA Part 145 approval. Should there be a non-negotiated withdrawal, the European Commission has said that the UK would be considered a third country. From October 2 2018, EASA has said that it will accept third country applications from UK holders of Part 145 approvals. Organisations will need to decide whether, in a non-negotiated withdrawal, they wish to retain both a national and an EASA approval. A UK- Part-145 would be needed to continue to certify UK-registered aircraft. Organisations will need to retain their UK approvals should they wish to access the benefits of any Bilateral Air Safety Agreement the UK has in place with third countries. Having a third country approval from EASA is unlikely to give you access to the benefits of the EU’s current Bilateral Air Safety Agreements.

Close

My UK based organisation has applied for a Third country approval from EASA, will EASA accept UK part 66 licences to support the approval?

When the UK leaves the EU it would be classified as a Third country, Part 145 has provision to use non-EASA licences to support an approval issued in Third Countries. This is set out in Part 145.A.30 (j) paragraphs 1 and 2 and subject to Appendix IV to Part 145. Certifying staff may be qualified in accordance with the national aviation regulations of the state in which the organisation facility is registered. You are advised to contact EASA as soon as possible to discuss the approval process in this scenario.

Close

How can my organisation continue to maintain/certify US, Canadian or Brazilian registered aircraft?

Should there be a non-negotiated withdrawal the EU air safety bilateral agreements would cease to be effective in the UK, however new agreements are being developed directly between the UK and the US’s FAA, Transport Canada and ANAC of Brazil to replace the EU Bilateral agreements which would provide a similar framework as exists today.

Close

How can my organisation continue to maintain/certify non-UK registered aircraft?

Your organisation would need to apply for an EASA-approval if your organisation intends to maintain aircraft registered in the EASA member states.  Other non-European states of registry may accept CAA issued approvals.

You are advised to contact EASA or the State of Registry NAA as soon as possible to discuss the application process in this scenario.

From October 2 2018, EASA has said that it will accept third country applications from UK holders of Part 145 approvals. Organisations will need to decide whether, in a non-negotiated withdrawal, they wish to retain both a national and an EASA approval.

The CAA intends to continue to recognise current (and valid) EASA certificates for an initial period of up to two years, but no decision has been made about ongoing validity after this period.

Organisations will need to retain their UK approvals should they wish to access the benefits of any Bilateral Air Safety Agreement the UK has in place with third countries. Having a third country approval from EASA is unlikely to give you access to the benefits of the EU’s current Bilateral Air Safety Agreements.

Close

If my company has an approval to maintain aircraft registered outside the EASA Member States, would it continue to be valid?

This is a decision for the National Aviation Authority of the state of registry. Please contact as soon as possible the specific NAA directly.

Close

Would I be able to continue to issue EASA Form-1 certificates under my UK approval?

No – once the UK formally leaves the EU, you would no longer be able to issue EASA- Form 1 certificates. The UK would issue Form 1 certificates independent of the EASA system. More information about CAA Form 1s will be made available in the near future.

Close

Could I fit a component released under an EASA Form 1 or equivalent to a UK registered aircraft?

Yes, these components could continue to fitted to a UK registered aircraft, but only for a period of up to two years.

Close

If my company employs Part 66 certifying staff with Non-UK issued Part 66 licences in the UK, could they continue to certify under my UK 145 approval?

Yes, they could continue to certify under the UK approval, but only for a period of up to two years. After that, the engineer would need to obtain a licence from the CAA.

Close


PART-145 MAINTENANCE OF COMPONENTS & SPECIALISED SERVICES – UK APPROVED

Would I be able to continue to issue EASA Form-1 certificates under my UK approval?

No – once the UK formally leaves the EU, you would no longer be able to issue EASA-approved Form 1 certificates. The UK would issue Form 1 certificates independent of the EASA system. More information about CAA Form 1s will be made available in the near future.

Close

Would Form 1 certificates issued by UK organisations be accepted by third countries?

This is a decision for the National Aviation Authority (NAA) of the state of registry. Please contact the specific NAA directly as soon as possible.

Close

Could I still use parts released under EASA Form 1 in order to complete maintenance, repairs and/or modifications to components?

Yes, these components could continue to be fitted to a component released under a CAA Form 1 from 29 March 2019 onwards, but only for a period of up to two years.

Close


PART-145 MAINTENANCE OF AIRCRAFT BY ORGANISATIONS LOCATED OUTSIDE THE UK

Would my organisation be able to certify UK-registered aircraft?

Yes, the CAA is intending to continue to recognise non-UK EASA Part 145 organisations for up to two years. To enable these organisations to release UK registered aircraft during this two-year period, an EASA Part 145 approval is to be recognised in UK legislation.  There may be some minor changes to the certificate of release to service to recognise the UK legal basis for the release.  More information on processes and timing will be available on this microsite in due course. Should an organisation wish to apply for a UK approval, however, please review the third country application page on the CAA website for further details.

Close

My organisation has facilities in the EU and within the UK. Could I accept UK issued Part 66 Licences?

When the UK leaves the EU it would be classified as a Third country, Part 145 has provision to use non-EASA licences to support an approval issued in Third Countries. This is set out in Part 145.A.30 (j) paragraphs 1 and 2 and subject to Appendix IV to Part 145. Certifying staff may be qualified in accordance with the national aviation regulations of the state in which the organisation facility is registered. You are advised to contact the relevant NAA as soon as possible to discuss the approval process in this scenario.

Close


PART-145 MAINTENANCE OF COMPONENTS & SPECIALISED SERVICES BY ORGANISATIONS LOCATED OUTSIDE THE UK

Would my organisation still be able to issue an EASA Form 1 to a product or component that has either been removed from or to be fitted to a UK registered aircraft?

Yes, as the current EASA system allows for components removed from Non-EU aircraft to be maintained and released with an EASA Form 1 providing the component conforms to EASA maintenance/design data.

Close

Object reference not set to an instance of an object.