Why are some pilots applying to transfer their State of Licence Issue (SoLI) from the UK to another EASA member state?

This could be for a variety of reasons but is often because the pilot expects to be operating EU-registered aircraft after the UK leaves the EU and therefore needs to hold an EASA member state licence rather than a UK one. The licence transfer process requires that the pilot’s medical records are also transferred to the receiving state.

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Does this process have to be completed by the date of the UK’s exit from the EU?

Yes, assuming the pilot concerned wishes to operate EU-registered aircraft from the day after the UK’s exit, though this will depend on the position of the EU.

The CAA has said it cannot guarantee that licence transfer applications submitted to the CAA after January 1 will have been processed successfully by us and will have been assessed so that the pilot can be issued with a medical certificate by the ‘new’ NAA by March 29, the scheduled date of the UK’s exit. All applications are being processed as quickly as possible by the UK CAA though it is important to note we are dependent on receiving a transfer request from the ‘new’ NAA as well as forms for licensing and medical records transfer from the applicant.

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Does Brexit mean that CAA-certificated AMEs won’t be able to issue medical certificates to pilots licenced by EASA member states once the UK has left the EU?

Yes. The European Commission has said that certificates issued by CAA-certificated AMEs would no longer be considered valid.

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Can a UK CAA-certificated AME apply for an AME certificate to another EASA member state?

Yes, but an AME can hold only one EASA State approval so a new EASA AME certificate would have to be issued after March 29. AMEs wishing to pursue this should contact the Medical Section of the relevant EASA NAA to which they wish to apply for certification.

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Will AMEs be able to hold both a UK AME certificate and an AME certificate issued by an EASA state after Brexit?

Yes, the applications processes and AME certificate issues will be independent in the same way that a UK AME can currently also hold a certificate issued by, for example, the FAA, Transport Canada or CASA Australia.

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What about UK Aeromedical Centres?

Since October 2018, EASA has said that it will accept third country applications from UK holders of Aeromedical Centre certificates. Organisations will need to decide whether, in a non-negotiated withdrawal, they wish to hold both a national and an EASA certificate. The CAA intends to continue to recognise current (and valid) EASA certificates for an initial period of up to two years, but no decision has been made about validity after this period. It is possible for UK Aeromedical Centres to apply to EASA for AeMC approval, but it is not clear how EASA will deal with the issue of the State (UK or EU) of AME certification of the Head of the Aeromedical Centre and other AMEs working in the Centre.

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Would AMEs still be able to issue medical certificates to pilots with UK-issued licences?

Yes. UK AMEs and Aeromedical Centres will retain their permissions and approvals under UK law. After the UK leaves the EU, UK-licensed pilots will have to have medical certificates issued by UK-approved AMEs and Aeromedical Centres. Medical certificates issued before the exit date will remain valid, even if issued by a non-UK EASA AME or Aeromedical Centre until they expire or for two years, whichever is earlier.

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Will UK-issued medical certificates be recognised in countries outside the EASA states?

The CAA’s oversight and approvals will continue to comply with ICAO’s Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPs) and therefore should continue to be recognised on a global basis.

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